Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Sonny Stitt & Zoot Sims_My Blue Heaven


Al Cohn and Zoot Sims - East Of The Sun And West Of The Moon




This recording was rather made in 1956, for a disc Al Cohn - Zoot Sims Quintet (Al Cohn, Zoot Sims (ts) Hank Jones (p) Milt Hinton (b) Osie Johnson (d) Webster Hall, NYC, January 24, 1956

Clyde McPhatter and The Drifters - Such A Night - Original Version (Pre Elvis)


Charlie Christian - Lester Young - Buck Clayton - ( Good Morning Blues - Live)



 Buck Clayton (tr) Lester Young (ts) Charlie Christian (gt),Freddie Green (rhythm-gt) Walter Page ( sb) Jo Jones ( dm) - New York - Carnegie Hall ( 24-12- 1939 Live Concert From Spirituals To Swing )

Friday, June 9, 2017

Wrecking the Ship of State


this from Dr. Paul Krugman in The New York Times  --  please follow link to original:    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/09/opinion/donald-trump-health-care-bill.html?ref=opinion&_r=0


After Donald Trump’s surprise election victory, many people on the right and even in the center tried to make the case that he wouldn’t really be that bad. Every time he showed a hint of self-restraint — even if it amounted to nothing more than reading his lines without ad-libbing and laying off Twitter for a day or two — pundits rushed to declare that he had just “become president.”
But can we now admit that he really is as bad as — or worse than — his harshest critics predicted he would be? And it’s not just his contempt for the rule of law, which came through so clearly in the James Comey testimony: As the legal scholar Jeffrey Toobin says, if this isn’t obstruction of justice, what is? There’s also the way Trump’s character, his combination of petty vindictiveness with sheer laziness, leaves him clearly not up to doing the job.
And that’s a huge problem. Think, for a minute, of just how much damage this man has done on multiple fronts in just five months.
Take health care. It’s still unclear whether Republicans will ever be able to pass a replacement for Obamacare (although it is clear that if they do, it will take coverage away from tens of millions). But whatever happens on the legislative front, there are big problems developing in the insurance markets as we speak: companies pulling out, leaving some parts of the country unserved, or asking for large increases in premiums.

Why? It’s not, whatever Republicans may say, because Obamacare is an unworkable system; insurance markets were clearly stabilizing last fall. Instead, as insurers themselves have been explaining, the problem is the uncertainty created by Trump and company, especially the failure to make clear whether crucial subsidies will be maintained. In North Carolina, for example, Blue Cross Blue Shield has filed for a 23 percent rise in premiums, but declared that it would have asked for only 9 percent if it were sure that cost-sharing subsidies would continue.
So why hasn’t it received that assurance? Is it because Trump believes his own assertions that he can cause Obamacare to collapse, then get voters to blame Democrats? Or is it because he’s too busy rage-tweeting and golfing to deal with the issue? It’s hard to tell, but either way, it’s no way to make policy.
Or take the remarkable decision to take Saudi Arabia’s side in its dispute with Qatar, a small nation that houses a huge U.S. military base. There are no good guys in this quarrel, but every reason for the U.S. to stay out of the middle.
The most likely explanation of his actions, which have provoked a crisis in the region (and pushed Qatar into the arms of Iran) is that the Saudis flattered him — the Ritz-Carlton projected a five-story image of his face on the side of its Riyadh property — and their lobbyists spent large sums at the Trump Washington hotel.
Normally, we would consider it ridiculous to suggest that an American president could be so ignorant of crucial issues, and be led to take dangerous foreign policy moves with such crude inducements. But can we believe this about a man who can’t accept the truth about the size of his inauguration crowds, who boasts about his election victory in the most inappropriate circumstances? Yes.
And consider his refusal to endorse the central principle of NATO, the obligation to come to our allies’ defense — a refusal that came as a shock and surprise to his own foreign policy team. What was that about? Nobody knows, but it’s worth considering that Trump apparently ranted to European Union leaders about the difficulty of setting up golf courses in their nations. So maybe it was sheer petulance.
The point, again, is that everything suggests that Trump is neither up to the job of being president nor willing to step aside and let others do the work right. And this is already starting to have real consequences, from disrupted health coverage to ruined alliances to lost credibility on the world stage.
But, you say, stocks are up, so how bad can it be? And it’s true that while Wall Street has lost some of its initial enthusiasm for Trumponomics — the dollar is back down to pre-election levels — investors and businesses don’t seem to be pricing in the risk of really disastrous policy.
That risk is, however, all too real — and one suspects that the big money, which tends to equate wealth with virtue, will be the last to realize just how big that risk really is. The American presidency is, in many ways, sort of an elected monarchy, in which a temperamentally and intellectually unqualified leader can do immense damage.
That’s what’s happening now. And we’re barely one-tenth of the way through Trump’s first term. The worst, almost surely, is yet to come.

"Jumpin' With Symphony Sid" by Lester Young


Lester Young and Teddy Wilson - Love me or Leave me


Lester Young "I didn't know what time it was"




With Roy Eldrifge, Vic Dickenson, Teddy Wilson, Fred Green, Gene Ramey & Jo Jones: NYC. 1956

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Ruby Braff & Ellis Larkins - Easy Living



Ruby Braff (tp,cor), Ellis Larkins (p)

Ruby Braff - Star Dust



Ruby Braff - Trumpet
Dave McKenna - Piano
Steve Jordan - Guitar
Buzzy Drootin - Drums

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

D-Day.

June 6 1944  --  D-Day.  The allies landed in Normandy, opening up a true second front.  Most of those brave men are gone now.  Today we remember ALL of them. 

We were great then, we are great now - but only if we are willing to realize it.  We don't need a "strong-man", we don't need a dictator, we just need the will to go forward into the future.  Fear-mongers beware, we are still a strong resilient nation.  Grow up.  Let us ALL get things done. 

There are no "end times", there's just tomorrow.  We, as individuals get old and die  --  others go on in our place.  That DEATH we ALL face, that's the "end-times" folks fear.  Put it aside and go on.  No more "snowflakes"  ---  left or right.  It's called life, there are NO "safe places".  Get over yourself and move forward.  That's what they did on D-Day.

Parker's Mood / Charlie Parker The Savoy Recordings



Charlie Parker (as)
John Lewis (p) 
Curly Russell (b) 
Max Roach (ds)

Charlie Parker - Embraceable You (Take 2 - 1947)


Charlie Parker - Embraceable You



Charlie Parker (as), Miles Davis (tp), Duke Jordan (p),Tommy Potter (b), Max Roach (ds)
rec. 28/10/1947 NYC

Charlie Parker - Koko


The GOP Must Take Responsibility for Trump | The Resistance with Keith Olbermann | GQ


Thursday, June 1, 2017

Joe Pass - I Remember Charlie Parker (Full Album)



Joe Pass - I Remember Charlie Parker

1979

1. Just Friends (John Klenner, Sam M. Lewis)
2. Easy to Love (Cole Porter)
3. Summertime (George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, DuBose Heyward) 
4. April in Paris (Vernon Duke, E. Y. Harburg) 
5. Everything Happens to Me (Tom Adair, Matt Dennis) 
6. Laura (Johnny Mercer, David Raksin) 
7. They Can't Take That Away from Me (G. Gershwin, I. Gershwin) 
8. I Didn't Know What Time It Was (Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart) 
9. If I Should Lose You (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin) 
10 Out of Nowhere (Johnny Green, Edward Heyman) 
11. Out of Nowhere (concept version)

Bud Shank Quintet featuring Carmel Jones - New Groove



Personnel: Carmel Jones (trumpet), Bud Shank (alto sax), Dennis Budimir (guitar), Gary Peacock (bass), Mel Lewis (drums)

Al Cohn-Zoot Sims/Live at the Half Note/1959...Lover Come Back To ME



Great Recording at one of the BEST clubs ever..Owner Mike Canterino introduces the personnel

In The Middle Of A Kiss - Zoot Sims Quartet



Zoot Sims (ts, ss) Hank Jones (pf) Milt Hinton (b) Grady Tate (ds)

Has Michael Flynn Already Flipped on Trump? | The Resistance with Keith Olbermann | GQ


Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Jimmy McGiff - Keep Loose (Live Video - late 60's)




France - late 1960's: Jimmy McGriff - org; Leo Johnson - tenor sax; Larry Frazier - guitar; Jesse Kilpatrick - drums.

Artie Shaw - The blues


Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Bill Evans & Stan Getz - But Beautiful (1974 Full Album)



But Beautiful is a jazz album by the Bill Evans Trio with Stan Getz, recorded live in Europe in 1974 and released in 1996.

Personel: Stan Getz (tsx) Bill Evans (p) Eddie Gómez (bs) Marty Morell (dr) 
Released: 1996
Recorded: August, 1974
Label: Milestone MCD 9249-2
Producer: Helen Keane

0:00 "Grandfather's Waltz" (Lasse Farnlof, Gene Lees) 
8:08 "Stan's Blues" (Gigi Gryce) 
13:56 "But Beautiful" (Jimmy Van Heusen, Johnny Burke) 
19:38 "Emily" (Johnny Mandel, Johnny Mercer) 
25:18 "Lover Man" (James Davis, Roger Ramirez, Jimmy Sherman) 
33:21 "Funkallero" (Bill Evans)
39:57 "The Peacocks" (James G. Rowles) 
47:12 "You and the Night and the Music" (Arthur Schwartz, Howard Dietz) 
54:50 "See-Saw" (Coleman) 
1:01:32 "The Two Lonely People" (Bill Evans, Carol Hall) 

Aside from a series of studio sessions a decade earlier for Verve, this LP represents the only other meeting featuring Stan Getz with pianist Bill Evans. Originally issued by the notorious bootleg label Jazzdoor with six selections from a Laren, Holland concert in 1974, Milestone acquired the masters for a legitimate release and added four bonus tunes from a concert in Antwerp, Belgium a week later. Getz meshes almost perfectly with Evans' trio (with bassist Eddie Gómez and drummer Marty Morell), with only one sore spot: Getz ignored the pianist's request not to play the under-rehearsed "Stan's Blues," which provoked Evans into quickly dropping out and signaling his sidemen to avoid solos of their own. But the remaining tracks are all invigorating, particularly Evans' brisk "Funkallero" and the lush take of Jimmy Rowles' ballad "The Peacocks." It seems a shame that there were not additional opportunities for Getz and Evans to work together on other occasions, but it is possible that their strong personalities would have clashed. Highly recommended!

40 Shady Things We Now Know About Trump and Russia | The Resistance with Keith Olbermann | GQ